KHARMA Day of Development Conference- May 11

By: Kalamazoo SHRM

KHRMA is once again holding it’s.. Day of Development Conference on May 11, 2018. They are excited to announce that the event is approved for 6.5 CE credits and 1.5 Business credits!  The closing keynote speaker will feature Tony Rubleski, the bestselling creator of the Mind Capture book series!  I’ve attached some additional information about our annual event, please consider sharing with your membership. 

For more event details, please visit: http://www.mishrm.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1088063&group=141773

American Society of Employers (ASE) announces Michigan’s premier total rewards Compensation and Benefits Conference will take place on May 23 at The Henry in Dearborn, MI

By: American Society of Employers

American Society of Employers (ASE) announces Michigan’s premier total rewards Compensation and Benefits Conference will take place on May 23 at The Henry in Dearborn, MI

Media Contact: Heather Nezich, ASE, 248.223.8040, hnezich@aseonline.org

Livonia, Mich. —April 12, 2018 — The  American Society of Employers (ASE), one of the nation’s oldest and largest employer associations providing people-management information and services to Michigan employers, announces its 8th annual Compensation and Benefits Conference will be held on Wednesday, May 23 at The Henry – Autograph Collection in Dearborn, MI. 

ASE CEO, Mary E. Corrado, announced the conference and stated, “Employee recruitment and retention continue to be top priorities for Michigan employers and the effectiveness of an organization’s total rewards programs affects both.  This conference will cover total rewards topics such as benefits, compensation, and wellness trends.  In addition, it will cover 2018 tax law changes, HR’s role in the opioid epidemic, pay equity and wage and hour updates.”

Additionally, ASE will reveal the results of its 2018 compensation surveys. It is the 66th year the surveys have been published.

The keynote speaker for the 2018 conference is Josh Schneider, Director of The Millennial & Employee Engagement Institute.  His presentation is entitled “The Employer-Employee Relationship Has Changed.  Forever.”  In this keynote presentation Josh will bring to the forefront new ideas, social psychology, and practical insights from the new pack of pioneers who have learned to unlock the human potential in their employees. For a complete conference agenda and registration information, please visit the ASE website.

About the American Society of Employers (ASE) – a Centennial Organization

Celebrating its 115th year, the American Society of Employers (ASE) is a not-for-profit trade association providing people-management information and services to Michigan employers. Since 1902, member organizations have relied on ASE to be their single, cost-effective source for information and support, helping to grow their bottom line by enhancing the effectiveness of their people. Learn more about ASE at www.aseonline.org.

Shell’s Wellness Journey: How Care Impacts Individual, Team, and Organizational Health

By: Michigan Wellness Council

April 11th Webinar: Shell’s Wellness Journey: How Care Impacts Individual, Team, and Organizational Health

By: Krystal Sexton, PhD, Americas Regional Lead for Human Performance and Care

National Association for Business Resources Best and  Brightest Programs is recognized by SHRM to offer SHRM-CP®or SHRM-SCP® professional development credits (PDCs). This program is pending for 1.0 PDC. For more information about certification or recertification, please visit www.shrmcertification.org.

Date: Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Schedule:
12:00pm to 1:00 pm

Presentation Objectives: Shell has had a long-standing wellness program for over two decades.  For much of its history, the wellness program focused on physical wellbeing, and over the past few years, it has expanded into mental and emotional wellness.  This presentation will discuss this evolution, specific programs on resilience and care for people, and the impact of care on business outcomes.

Participants will:

  1. Learn how the holistic approach to wellness was developed
  2. Identify strategies to build the business case for care and wellness
  3. Understand Shell’s approach to quantifying health programs with regard to business outcomes

Speaker Bio: Krystal Sexton, PhD, is the Americas Regional Lead for Human Performance and Care at

Shell.  Trained as an epidemiologist, Krystal joined Shell in 2013 after a career in academic medicine.  At Shell,

she developed the analytic approaches for large global projects, with a focus on Resilience and Care for People.  As Shell developed its Human Performance and Care strategy, she expanded her work into cognitive and social neuroscience, positive psychology, and organizational psychology to better understand  the interplay between these subjects and organizational performance.  Today, Krystal has a largely business interfacing role, synthesizing science into business outcomes for leadership teams across Shell.

Krystal received her PhD from the University of Texas School of Public Health and completed postdoctoral fellowships at both MD Anderson Cancer Center and Baylor College of Medicine.  She holds an adjunct assistant professor at UTSPH and is an active member of several scientific and academic organizations.

Registration

$15 advance registration (non-members; become a member)

Register now by following this link.

Michigan  Wellness Council (MWC) is a nonprofit whose vision is the health and wellbeing of Michigan employers will be the best in the nation and mission is to inspire implementation of leading workplace wellness strategies through thought-leadership and education.

Contact: Rita Patel rita.patel@michiganwellnesscouncil.org

American Society of Employers (ASE) releases 2018 Starting Salaries for Co-op Students and Recent College Graduates Survey

By: American Society of Employers

Large spike seen in hiring of Human Resources/Labor Relations graduates.

Media Contact: Heather Nezich, Manager, Communications, ASE, 248.223.8040, hnezich@aseonline.org

Livonia, Mich. —March 27, 2018 — The American Society of Employers (ASE), one of the nation’s oldest and largest employer associations, released the organization’s 2018 Starting Salaries for Co-op Students and Recent College Graduates Survey today. The annual survey provides a comprehensive look at the current state of wages and benefits provided to co-op students and recent college graduates.  The survey also presents employers a snapshot of the recruitment and retention trends associated with these new entrants to the workforce.

Mary E. Corrado, ASE President and CEO, stated, “Today’s employers must be able to attract these newest entrants to the workforce with competitive wages.  They also must be prepared to help them adapt to the work environment and set clear career goals in order to retain these younger workers.”

164 companies responded to the 2018 Starting Salaries for Co-op Students and Recent College Graduates Survey.  The average number of employees per participant was 827.  80% of respondents are located in the metro Detroit region with 49% of those classified as automotive suppliers.

2018 Starting Salaries for Co-op Students and Recent College Graduates Survey Highlights:

  • Nearly three out of four (73%) respondents say their company has hired, or plans to hire, a recent college graduate in 2018, similar to what was reported in 2017.
    • While the percentage of companies hiring a recent college graduate is similar to last year, less organizations are increasing their efforts to do so.
    • 23% of the companies have increased their hiring efforts this year compared to last year, a decrease of 9% from 2017.
    • Even though fewer companies are increasing their hiring efforts, the number of companies who decreased their efforts remains at 3%, and we instead saw an 8% increase in those whose efforts remained the same.
  • Statistically, the top five in-state institutions the responding companies actively recruit from are: 1) Michigan State University; 2) University of Michigan; 3) Wayne State University; 4) Oakland University; 5) Michigan Technological University.
  • Based on hiring activity, the top three most popular technical Bachelor-degree disciplines hired in the past year were: 1) Mechanical Engineering; 2) Electrical Engineering; 3) Computer Science
    • The overall hiring of graduates with a Computer Science degree increased by 12% from last year.
  • Based on hiring activity, the top three most popular non-technical Bachelor-degree disciplines hired in the past year were: 1) Business Administration; 2) Accounting; 3) tied between Finance and HR/Labor Relations
    • The hiring of graduates with an HR/Labor Relations degree for companies with 1 to 100 employees went from 0% in 2017 to 14% this year.
  • The top three knowledge/skill factors organizations consider when making hiring decisions, in order, are: 1) related coursework; 2) computer skills; 3) degree level.
  • The top three perceived shortcomings of recent college graduates are: 1) adaptation to work environment (57%); 2) career expectations (56%); 3) compensation expectations (49%).
  • Of the seven disciplines named above (Business Administration, Accounting, Finance, HR/Labor Relations, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science) the highest starting salaries went to the engineering disciplines.  The average starting salary for Mechanical Engineering was $65,160; and for Electrical Engineering the average was $58,865.  Finance came in at $52,686; Computer Science came in at $52,513; Accounting came in at $51,733; Business Administration came in at $50,965; and HR/Labor Relations came in at $49,809.
  • Pay rates for high school and college co-ops and interns were separated by technical and non-technical roles; the average hourly rate for a college senior in a technical field is $17.66 and $15.47 for a non-technical field; the average hourly rate for a college junior in a technical field is $16.46 and $14.70 for a non-technical field.

To obtain a copy of the 2018 Starting Salaries for Co-op Students and Recent College Graduates Survey, contact Kevin Marrs, Vice President at ASE, 248-223-8025 or kmarrs@aseonline.org.

About the American Society of Employers (ASE) – a Centennial Organization

Celebrating its 115th year of service, The American Society of Employers (ASE) is a not-for-profit trade association providing people-management information and services to Michigan employers. Since 1902, member organizations have relied on ASE to be their single, cost-effective source for information and support, helping to grow their bottom line by enhancing the effectiveness of their people. Learn more about ASE at www.aseonline.org.

Recruiting, Retaining, and Rewarding your Employees

By: Lovasco

RECRUITING, RETAINING, & REWARDING

 YOUR EMPLOYEES

APRIL 26, 2018

TIME
7:30 a.m. – Breakfast & Networking
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. – Presentation
9:00 – 9:20 a.m. – Q&A
LOCATION
Maddin, Hauser, Roth & Heller, P.C.
28400 Northwestern Highway,
Southfield, Michigan 48034
RECERTIFICATION
Valid for 1 PDC toward
SHRM-CPand SHRM-SCP recertification
REGISTRATION
RSVP to Ashley Andrews, (248) 359-6320
AAndrews@maddinhauser.com
Recruiting and retaining employees presents a great challenge with the lowest unemployment rate in years. Please attend this seminar to learn some creative ideas on how to separate your company in this competitive environment.
JAMES M. REID, IV

Shareholder, Co-Chairman

Corporate/Employment Practice Group,

Maddin, Hauser, Roth & Heller, P.C.

 

CHRIS BURKE

JD, CFP®, AIF®, CRPC®

Vice President, Retirement Plan

Advisory Services, LoVasco Consulting Group

 

 

“Hot Topics in HRM” Roundtable Event Brings Human Resource Management Experts to Marygrove College March 29, 2018

By: Marygrove College

Detroit, March 13, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Marygrove College will host “Hot Topics in Human Resource Management,” a roundtable discussion, networking, and professional development event on Thursday, March 29. Board members from the Detroit Chapter of Society of Human Resource Management, including President David Turner, and healthcare HRM expert Victoria Hollister, are the featured speakers.

“Human resources is about relationships and community building,” said Marygrove’s assistant professor and coordinator of the Human Resource Management program Jerry van Rossum. “That’s exactly what this event is about: bringing HRM professionals together so they can connect, grow, and learn from each other and leading industry experts. We’ll be touching on some touchy but critical HR topics, like sexual harassment and undocumented workers.”

In addition to Ms. Hollister and Mr. Turner, the leadership of the Detroit Chapter of SHRM, former President Debra Williams and board members Paul Sturgis, Joline Davis, Veretta Nix, and Nikki Kallek will participate.

The event begins at 7:00 p.m. with light refreshments in the college’s Madame Cadillac Building and is free of charge and open to the public. The roundtable and community dialogue follows at 7:45 p.m. For more information or to RSVP for the event, contact lkopack@marygrove.edu or (313) 927-1383 by March 28, 2018.

Established in the city of Detroit in 1927, Marygrove College is an independent Catholic college sponsored by the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (IHM) and guided by the values of human dignity; community; social justice; ecological justice; excellence; innovation; and diversity. The campus is situated on 53 wooded acres at 8425 W. McNichols Rd., Detroit, MI 48221. Visit http://www.marygrove.edu.

Attachments:
A photo accompanying this announcement is available at
http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/4001a524-2a3f-4ff4-9d24-2e3f186db21a

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/d25ed6c7-3d7f-4f4c-89ea-36266f807a4a


Renee Ahee

Marygrove College

(313) 927-1438

rahee@marygrove.edu

People First: Designing Meaningful Wellbeing Programs

By: Michigan Wellness Council

Get your spot!

Join us on May 9th for our
1st Half-Day Conference in Grand Rapids:
People First: Designing Meaningful Wellbeing Programs

When: WednesdayMay 9, 2018, 8:30am am to 2:00pm
Where: Stonewater Country Club, 7177 Kalamazoo Ave. SE Caledonia, MI 49316
Certification: This program is valid for 4 PDCs.*

8:30am to 9:00am Registration, Breakfast, Welcome

9:00am to 10:00am Case Study: Taking Care of Your People: Karen Personett, Manager of Wellness & Health Promotion at DTE Energy

10:15am to 11:15am Designing for Behavior Change: Jeffrey Kullgren MD, MS, MPH, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine at University of Michigan Medical School

11:30am to 12:30pm Case Study: Bell’s Brewery Culture: Carmen Johnson, Payroll and Benefits Specialist at Bell’s Brewery, Inc.

12:30pm to 1:00pm Buffet Lunch and Exhibitor Showcase

1:00pm to 2:00pm Well-Being, Social Impact, and Leading Through Values: Jonathan So, Senior Director of Health Care Initiatives at Detroit Regional Chamber

Register Here
$80 advance registration (members); $90 (non-members) – become a member
$85 registration on the day of the event (members); $95 (non-members)

Contact Rita for sponsorship opportunities

*(Provided by our Education Partner: National Association for Business Resources Best and  Brightest Programs is recognized by SHRM to offer SHRM-CP®or SHRM-SCP® professional development credits (PDCs).

The Case of the Bamboozled Boss

By: Meadows Consulting

Like the many that preceded him, Jack Burdon had a sloped walk, dour expression and ruffled appearance and bore the weight of someone who had spent his life moving through the corridors, in and out of the cubicles that housed employees whom he’d supervised and bullied for too many lifetimes. When I agreed to meet with him at the Starbucks on Mack and Woodward just south of downtown Detroit, I assumed he was less concerned about privacy or he just wanted to use his Starbucks gift card.

I sat at a two-seater table, next to the window that offered a view of the mechanized and pedestrian traffic. I watched the blue and red QLine glide noiselessly by carrying its diverse citizens to their Woodward destinations when he stood over the seat next to me

“Are you H.R.?” He asked before he sat down. After years of hearing that as a lead in question, I’d run out of snappy answers and learned to live with just giving a nod.

“Thanks for agreeing to meet with me.” He slumped, nervously,  in the chair as if a huge predator had just swooped down on his shoulders. “I am at the end of my rope and I hope you can help me.”

After 30 years in the people business, that statement had been uttered by thousands of lost souls who were, usually, at a crossroad where the next step would take them down a darker path or toward a dimly lit road. “I’m listening,” I said.

He sighed as if his heart was lodged in his throat, making it difficult to release his exasperation in a long exhale or worse, he was getting ready to cry. “All my employees hate me.”

“Any idea why?” I asked as my mind raced through the thousands of reasons that had their own variations under several re-occurring themes.

“No,” he stated, “It has me completely bamboozled.”

I remember taking a moment to recall the last time I heard someone use that word. Regaining focus, I asked, “Can you think of anything you might be doing that would bring about this perceived hate?”

“It’s not perceived,” he shot back. “Just yesterday someone put drops of Coca-Cola in my contact lens cleanser.”

“Regular or Diet?”

“Diet. My pupils were only slightly irritated.” He rubbed his left eye and continued. “What could I have possibly done to make someone do that?”

“Which goes back to my question. Can you think of anything you might be doing that would bring about this prankish hate?”

He delayed his response by taking a sip of regular coffee from the grande cup, swished it around, swallowed and said. “I’ve been told that I am a bully.”

“Who told you that? Your employees?”

“Just the 15 that I’ve fired as well as my wife, my pastor, my two remaining friends who both live outside of Michigan, my next door neighbor and her cocker spaniel.”

“That’s a pretty diverse crowd with a similar opinion,” I said. “When did you decide everyone, including the cocker spaniel, was right?”

He hesitated.

“Someone changed my screen saver at work. It used to say, ‘Because I am the boss, that’s why?’ ”

“Now, what does it say?” I asked.

“There’s a box seat in Hell with your ticket number.” He added, “The message also included red emoji’s with horns and a pitchfork.”

With each sentence he uttered, I pieced together his profile from the thousands of cases stored in my memory. Promoted to a manager at a young age (check), started out as the ‘shining star’ of management (check), never trained to be a manager (check), learned by dodging (check), was beat out by someone on his high school athletic team (check), likes scaring sleeping cats just to watch them jump (check), hasn’t been promoted in years (check) always told by the company that he’s needed in the role that he’s in (check), motivates by fear (check).

“…so now my boss is sending signals that he wants to get rid of me.” (check)

Profile almost complete. Refocus.

“Mr. Burdon, finish this sentences with the first words that comes to mind. My employees are my..,?

“..,playground”

“A good manager is..,”

“..,easy on the furniture.”

“The best employees are..,”

“..,submissive.”

“I like my job because..,”

“..,it’s who I am.”

Jack Burdon was a beached whale wallowing in the fast lane of social movement. His shining star was caught in the gravitational pull of a black hole and there was no passing comet to bump him back into orbit. He relabeled his frustration as loyalty and convinced himself that the world owed him a debt of gratitude for keeping the barbarians in their cubicles. He was a legal staff’s worst nightmare. Protected by a boss who values productivity over decency and the numbers speak to his worth. It was clear that the shift in Jack’s stellar universe after the third denial of a promotion by a boss whom he made look good.

Unable to move up or out, he directed his inability toward the residents of Cubicle Court, slashing at every one of their attempts to better their performance and backing himself into a corner where he was an easy target for anyone wanting to fight back. He didn’t chose to contact me, it was chosen for him. His next step was not about his career, but his survival.

“Jack,” I said, “Your story has a far too familiar ring to it and while I find it fascinating that I had a similar conversation with someone in 1988, and 30 years later, this conversation still exists. It’s not a matter of whether I take you on as a client, which I will, the issue is whether you are willing to work on what ails you, not the people that you sicken.”

Stunned, he leaned back in his chair, pondered for a moment and said, “I have to get better or I am going to be fired. Where do we start?”

I smiled.

“The gap between survival and success is only as wide as the willingness to move forward.” Anonymous

“HR in the Wake of the Weinstein Sex Scandal”

By: Detroit Labor and Employment Relations Association and Labor@Wayne

Detroit Labor and Employment Relations Association (LERA) and

Labor@Wayne cordially invites you to its next meeting.

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Breakfast Program- 7:30-9:00 a.m.

Please join us for a very timely presentation on “HR in the Wake of the Weinstein Sex Scandal”

Featuring Kathy and Robert Chiaravalli

Location: Westin Southfield Hotel- 1500 Town Center, Southfield, MI 48075

Cost: $25 per person, $5 student rate. Payment can be made at the event.

Please email your RSVP confirmation by March 26, 2018 to lera@cousenslaw.com or call 248-355-2150

Any questions, please contact Dr. Marick Masters at 313-577-5358 or marickm@wayne.edu

Debunking the ‘Corporate Wellness is a Fad’ Myth

By: Michigan Wellness Council

Register today!

Join us on March 21st for a Panel Presentation & Discussion:
Debunking the ‘Corporate Wellness is a Fad’ Myth

Presented by MWC board members
Mary Kline (Owner, OnSite Wellness)
Mary Jo LeFevre (Vice President, Client Executive, Hylant Group)
Mary Marzec PhD (Senior Researcher and Analyst, RedBrick Health)

When: WednesdayMarch 21, 2018, 8am to 10am
Where: Beaumont Corporate Services, Mackinaw Conference Room, 15500 Lundy Parkway, Dearborn  MI 48126
Certification: This program is valid for 1.5 PDCs.*

Overview: Analysts and executives continue to ask ‘Do wellness programs work?’ or ‘Is corporate wellness a fad?’ The three Ted Talk like presentations and the following group discussion will provide attendees with different perspectives and context driven understanding of why these types of questions continue to be asked as well as how to respond to them. We will also address how these programs are expanding and becoming more sophisticated and are becoming an essential component to an organization’s culture.

Michigan Wellness Council Board Member Presenters Backgrounds:

Mary Kline As co-owner of OnSite Wellness (OSW), Mary is responsible for the business aspects and challenges the OSW team to exceed expectations. Her love of life, people, and sports has led Mary into a career path that has provided fun and healthy activities for people of all ages! Mary’s career began in the field of recreation and she has been working in corporate wellness for the past 17 years. Mary is a graduate of Calvin College with a BA in Physical Education and Recreation, and has a Master of Public Administration from Grand Valley State University. Mary is also a certified Worksite Wellness Program Consultant. She loves to play most sports and is an avid golfer. Her greatest pleasure is her family, most notably her six adorable grandchildren.

Mary Jo LeFevre is Vice President, Client Executive at Hylant Group.  She has over 20 years of group employee benefits experience and attained CEBS degree in 2000. Mary Jo presented at the 2009 MISHRM Conference on ‘Managing Employee Stress in Dire Economic Times’. She was also published in the December 2009 in Corp! Magazine, ‘Wellness Programs 101′.

Mary Marzec PhD is a Senior Researcher and Analyst at RedBrick Health. Dr. Mary Marzec was the Health Senior Researcher and Data Analyst at the University of Michigan, Health Management Research Center for 10 years. Her main areas of focus include stress and assessing how the culture at workplaces support health. She led the development and practical application of the Workplace Culture of Health survey. The survey, in conjunction with a strategy worksheet, allows organizations the ability to quantify factors related to culture. By identifying strengths and opportunities in the culture, an organization can bring these areas into alignment. This allows for more effective health promotion strategies and initiatives. Mary has a PhD in Movement Science and a MS from the Department of Biostatistics both from the University of Michigan. Her Bachelor’s degree is from Albion College and is a high school graduate of Cranbrook/Kingswood in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. She has earned multiple outstanding paper awards for her publications and has presented at national conferences.

*(Provided by our Education Partner: National Association for Business Resources Best and  Brightest Programs is recognized by SHRM to offer SHRM-CP®or SHRM-SCP® professional development credits (PDCs).