Contractual Limitations Periods

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By:  Claudia D. Orr, Plunkett Cooney

 

Contractual Limitations Periods

 

Today I write about contractual limitations, one of my absolute favorite defenses. When one of my clients gets sued and does not have a contractual limitations period agreement with the plaintiff, and it would have defeated the claims, I am really, really, disappointed. This has been a valid defense for claims brought under Michigan law since 2001. Therefore, there is no reason for any employer not to have this agreement with its employees.

When I read Dzurka v MidMichigan Medical Center-Midland wherein the Michigan Court of Appeals recently upheld the dismissal of the state law claims on this basis I thought this was a great opportunity to remind employers just how important this is!

Keeping the story brief, the plaintiff filed her complaint in the Midland Circuit Court on December 5, 2017 (765 days after her termination of employment and 36 days after the dismissal of a related federal lawsuit).  The trial court enforced a contractual limitations period found on plaintiff’s 2007 employment application which stated:

Limitations on Claims.  I agree that any lawsuit against MidMichigan Health and/or its agents arising out of my employment or termination of employment including but not limited to claims arising under State or Federal civil rights statutes, must be brought within the following time limits or be forever barred: (a) for lawsuits requiring a Notice of Right to Sue from the EEOC, within 90 days after the EEOC issues that Notice, or (b) for all other lawsuits, within (i) 180 days of the event(s) giving rise to the claim or (ii) the time limit specified by statutes, whichever is shorter.  I waiver any statute of limitations that exceeds this time limit.

Not bad.  I write mine a little differently, but this version did the trick in this case. The trial court found it enforceable and dismissed the lawsuit. On appeal, the plaintiff argued that the “agreement” lacked mutuality of obligation and therefore it failed because it lacked consideration.  The appellate court disagreed, recognizing that the grant of employment established consideration, and the dismissal was upheld.

It is unclear whether a contractual limitations period is applicable to federal civil rights claims, but there are plenty of cases that suggest it would.  Unfortunately, we know that contractual limitations will not apply to claims under the federal wage law (at least in the Sixth Circuit).

Does your employment application have a contractual limitations period on it?  If not, what are you waiting for? A final note: it likely will not be enforceable if it is in the Employee Handbook because if the handbook is written correctly it starts off by saying “nothing in this handbook creates any contractual rights.”  That means if the employer wants to enforce a term it has to be in a separate “contract”.  If you need assistance in drafting a contractual limitations period, contact an experienced employment attorney.

This article was written by Claudia D. Orr, who is Secretary of the Board of Detroit SHRM, a member of the Legal Affairs Committee, and an experienced labor/employment attorney at the Detroit office of Plunkett Cooney (a full service law firm and resource partner of Detroit SHRM) and an arbitrator with the American Arbitration Association.  She can be reached at corr@plunkettcooney.com or at (313) 983-4863. For further information go to: http://www.plunkettcooney.com/people-105.html

 Detroit SHRM encourages members to share these articles with others, inside and outside their organization, as long as its name and logo, and the author’s information, is included in the re-post of the article. February 2019.

ASE’s Annual HR Conference will take place March 14 in Novi, MI. Conference prepares HR professionals for the future of HR

By: American Society of Employers (ASE)

 

Media Contact: Heather Nezich, ASE, 248.223.8040, hnezich@aseonline.org

 

ASE’s Annual HR Conference will take place March 14 in Novi, MI. Conference prepares HR professionals for the future of HR

Livonia, Mich. —February 7, 2019 — The  American Society of Employers (ASE), one of the nation’s oldest and largest employer associations celebrating over 115 years of services, will hold its 16th Annual HR Conference on March 14 at the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi, MI. The event attracts more than 400 attendees and is the region’s most anticipated one-day Human Resources conference.

“This year’s conference is about the future of HR,” stated ASE President & CEO, Mary E. Corrado. “The war for talent and quickly evolving technology are creating new HR challenges.  HR professionals must keep evolving and this conference offers the education and resources to do just that.”

Keynote speakers at this year’s conference will be Seth Mattison and Don Rheem.

Seth Mattison, Speaker, Author, Co-Founder and Chief Movement Officer of Luminate Labs, will present “Future Forces: Insights to Navigate Change, Elevate Impact and Activate Growth.” This presentation is designed to help individuals understand the forces impacting the future and equip them with the practical tools and techniques to deepen their connection to those around them, amplify their capacity to positively effect change, and activate high performance for themselves, their teams, and their organizations.

Don Rheem, Speaker, Author, CEO and Founder of E3 Solutions, will present “Thrive by Design: The Neuroscience That Drives High-Performance Cultures.” In this energizing keynote Don Rheem breaks down the science that triggers exemplary workplace behavior at a neurological level, so you can understand how to foster a thriving culture and apply what you’re learning immediately.

Conference breakout sessions include:

Employee Experience

  • It’s Not Just About the Space: Leading with Purpose in Your Office Transition
  • Engaged Employees – Guaranteed Solutions for Managers to Increase Staff Retention & Performance
  • It’s Hard to Be Engaged When You’re Exhausted: Effective Techniques for Addressing Employee Stress & Burnout

Legal Compliance, Conflict, and Diversity

  • Ignorance Is Not Bliss: Staying on Top of the Changing Legal Landscape in 2019
  • Harnessing the Power of Productive Conflict
  • Diversity as a Business Strategy

Leadership Development

  • Developing VUCA Skills in Leadership
  • Millennials in Leadership
  • Optimizing HR Through Workflow Analysis|

Technology, Trends, and Analytics

  • The Future of Work: Debunking Myths Around AI and Navigating New HR Realities
  • The Hard Facts on HR Software: Using Data to Boost Your Software Selection Success
  • The Future Workforce: Are You Ready?

Early bird registration ends February 15, 2019.  For a complete conference agenda and registration information, please visit the ASE website.

About the American Society of Employers (ASE) – a Centennial Organization

Celebrating 115 years, the American Society of Employers (ASE) is a not-for-profit trade association providing people-management information and services to Michigan employers. Since 1902, member organizations have relied on ASE to be their single, cost-effective source for information and support, helping to grow their bottom line by enhancing the effectiveness of their people. Learn more about ASE at www.aseonline.org.

Advance your Career with SHRM Certification Register for the EMU Winter SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP Prep Classes

By: Eastern Michigan University

 

Advance your Career with SHRM Certification
Register for the EMU Winter SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP Prep Classes

 

Earn your SHRM Certified Professional (SHRM-CP™) and SHRM Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP™) certifications. Open doors for advancement and signal to employers your advanced professional development. Eastern Michigan University in co-sponsorship with GAASHRM and DSHRM is offering SHRM Learning System® for Winter 2019 for $1,200, including your copy of the 2019 SHRM LS modules plus SHRM Certification online resources that include over 1000 practice questions, at the following locations:

  • Livonia: Mondays, 6–9 p.m., February 18 – May 6, 2019
  • Troy: Wednesdays, 6–9 p.m., February 20 – May 8, 2019
  • Ann Arbor: Thursdays, 6–9 p.m., February 21 – May 9, 2019

For more information, contact Dr. Fraya Wagner-Marsh, SHRM-SCP, GPHR, SPHR at fwagnerm@emich.edu or Jaclyn Hasselzahl at jhassenz@emich.edu (734-487-9045). Register at http://www.emich.edu/extended/training/professional-development/hr_training/

 

 

EEO-1 Filing Deadline Extended until May 31, 2019

By: Miriam L. Rosen, McDonald Hopkins PLC

 

EEO-1 Filing Deadline Extended until May 31, 2019

 

On February 1, 2019, the EEOC announced an extension of the filing deadline for the 2018 EEO-1 report from March 31, 2019 to May 31, 2019. The extension is the result of the partial federal government shut down, which delayed mailing of log-in information for the EEO-1 web portal.

The EEOC indicated that the filing portal will now be open in early March.  In addition, the EEOC will soon release more information about EEO-1 filing and suggests employers monitor the EEO-1 website.

Completing the EEO-1 form can be a trying process.  If you are in need of a refresher on EEO-1 basics, here are answers to a few common questions related to preparing and filing the EEO-1 report:

  • Does my company need to file an EEO-1 Report?

All companies that meet the criteria below are required to file the EEO-1 report annually:

  1. Subject to Title VII of the Civil Rights with 100 or more employees; or
  2. Subject to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act with fewer than 100 employees if the company is owned by or corporately affiliated with another company and the entire enterprise employs a total of 100 or more employees; or
  3. Federal government prime contractors or first-tier subcontractors subject to Executive Order 11246 with 50 or more employees and a prime contract or first-tier subcontract amounting to $50,000 or more.
  • What information is used to complete the EEO-1 Report?

The EEO-1 Report is based on workforce data from one payroll in the fourth quarter of 2018.

  • How is an employee’s ethnicity determined for EEO-1 reporting purposes?

The EEOC notes that employee self-identification is the preferred method of identifying the race and ethnic information necessary for completing the EEO-1 report. Employers are required to attempt to allow employees to use self-identification to complete the EEO-1 report. If an employee declines to self-identify, employment records or observer identification may be used.

Employers can find additional answers to EEO-1 preparation and filing questions at the EEOC’s web page: EEO-1 Frequently Asked Questions and Answer at: https://www.eeoc.gov/employers/eeo1survey/faq.cfm.

This article was written by Miriam L. Rosen, who is Chair of the Legal Affairs Committee of Detroit SHRM and Chair of the Labor and Employment Law Practice Group in the Bloomfield Hills office of McDonald Hopkins PLC, a full-service law firm. She can be reached at mrosen@mcdonaldhopkins.com or at (248) 220-1342.

 

Detroit SHRM encourages members to share these articles with others, inside and outside their organization, as long as its name and logo, and the author’s information, is included in the re-post of the article. February 2019.

American Society of Employers (ASE) Welcomes 17 New Members

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By: American Society of Employers (ASE)

 

Media Contact: Heather Nezich, Manager, Communications, ASE, 248.223.8040, hnezich@aseonline.org

 

American Society of Employers (ASE) Welcomes 17 New Members

Livonia, Mich. —January 24, 2019 — The American Society of Employers (ASE), one of the nation’s oldest and largest employer associations, announces 17 organizations joined ASE as members during the fourth quarter of 2018. The organizations are:

  • AcuMax Index is an assessment designed to identify the natural wiring of job candidates and existing employees. Insights from the AcuMax Index are helping organizations to hire and develop a strong, productive workforce.  They are located in Dearborn.
  • Destination Ann Arbor is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to enhance the economy of the Ann Arbor area, and Washtenaw County in general, through the promotion of the area as a destination for day and overnight visitors.
  • Dynamic Computer Corporation delivers customized IT solutions for asset and lifecycle management (ITAM), unified endpoint management (UEM) and IoT product development.  They are located in Farmington Hills.
  • Flexible Metal, Inc. designs and manufactures metal tubular assemblies for diesel and gasoline engines, automobiles, on-highway, and off-highway vehicles, agricultural vehicles, engine generator sets and a wide variety of original equipment applications.  They are located in Hamburg.
  • Macomb County Department of Planning and Economics specializes in providing services to businesses at all stages of development with a concentration on the high-growth industries of aerospace, alternative energy, advanced manufacturing, defense, and homeland security.
  • Michigan Bankers Association is a trade association of Michigan financial institutions which currently includes more than 2,300 branches located throughout the state.  They are located in Lansing.
  • Michigan Manufacturing Technology Center is an organization dedicated to supporting Michigan manufacturers to work smarter, to compete and to prosper.  They have several locations throughout Michigan.
  • P & C Group I, Inc. supplies automotive parts and accessories. The Company offers seat structures and wire frames, latches, hinges, wire seat suspensions, wire frames, visor rods, and towel bar assemblies.  They are located in Farmington Hills.
  • Randazzo Heating and Cooling is a family-owned, Michigan-based company that provides heating and cooling services.  They are located in Macomb and serve southeast Michigan.
  • Reverie produces custom mattresses and is located in Bloomfield Hills.
  • Southwest Detroit Community Justice Center serves a mission to increase public trust in the justice system, assist in the reduction of crime, improve the quality of life, and meet the needs of the community.
  • Ternes provides packaging solutions to the automotive industry and is located in Livonia.
  • The Library Network is a public library cooperative serving 75 libraries in southeast Michigan whose mission is to provide and facilitate quality services developed through the collaboration of member libraries.  They are located in Novi.
  • The University of Michigan is a top-ranked public university located in Ann Arbor.
  • University Pediatricians provide comprehensive medical treatment and services in all areas of pediatric medicine in coordination with the Children’s Hospital of Michigan.

ASE President & CEO, Mary E. Corrado, made the announcement and stated, “ASE welcomes our newest members and looks forward to being their number one resource for all the HR and employment-related needs.”

 

About the American Society of Employers (ASE) – a Centennial Organization

Celebrating 115 years, the American Society of Employers (ASE) is a not-for-profit trade association providing people-management information and services to Michigan employers. Since 1902, member organizations have relied on ASE to be their single, cost-effective source for information and support, helping to grow their bottom line by enhancing the effectiveness of their people. Learn more about ASE at www.aseonline.org.

Whistleblower Claim Delivered To The Employee With A Bow!

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By:  Claudia D. Orr, Attorney, Plunkett Cooney

 

Whistleblower Claim Delivered To The Employee With A Bow!

 

Sometimes I read an opinion and I am just astonished by the decisions made by the employer and just how wrong things can go.  This is a case that never should have happened and probably wouldn’t have had the employer obtained legal advice before acting. Let’s look at what happened in Apacanis v Carter and Services to Enhance Potential (STEP), a recent unpublished decision of the Michigan Court of Appeals.

STEP is a nonprofit that contracts with Detroit/Wayne County Mental Health Authority (the Authority) to provide various services to individuals who have mental health issues or other disabilities. Plaintiff Whitley Apacanis is employed by STEP and receives job-training assistance from it.  Defendant Carter is employed by STEP as a liaison between outside agencies and clients, like plaintiff.  Clients, like plaintiff, receive on-the-job training as they work in STEP’s workshop assembling various items.  Clients also receive a small payment for their work.

One evening, plaintiff and Samuel Eiland, another STEP client, engaged in a number of sexual acts at Eiland’s home. All but one sexual act was consensual. But that is all it takes because no means no.  When plaintiff objected, Eiland sexually assaulted her.  Plaintiff reported the assault to the police and also to the courts via her request for a personal protective order against Eiland.

Plaintiff also reported the assault to STEP. While no assaultive behavior occurred at work, Eiland was banned from the premises and suspended as a client. Significantly, STEP also suspended plaintiff because she had reported the crime to the police and had obtained a PPO.  In fact, the written suspension given to plaintiff stated: “Consumer suspended from program until completion of pending criminal investigation.” Is that a collective gasp I am hearing from readers? It took my breath away to be sure.

Plaintiff sued under the Whistleblowers’ Protection Act (WPA), MCL 15.361, et seq, and the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act (ELCRA), MCL 37.2101, et seq. The case was dismissed by the lower court when it granted the defendants’ motion for summary disposition.

On appeal, the dismissal of the retaliation claim under ELCRA was upheld by the appellate court because there was no evidence that STEP took any action against plaintiff based on the exercise of any rights under ELCRA. The alleged assault did not occur on the premises and STEP took appropriate action by removing Eiland as soon as it received notice of plaintiff’s allegations.

However, the WPA claim is a problem for STEP.  The WPA makes it unlawful for an employer to-

[d]ischarge, threaten, or otherwise discriminate against an employee regarding the employee’s compensation, terms, conditions, location, or privileges of employment because the employee … reports or is about to report, verbally or in writing, a violation or a suspected violation of a law or regulation or rule promulgated pursuant to law of this state, a political subdivision of this state, or the United States to a public body, unless the employee knows that the report is false, or because an employee is requested by a public body to participate in an investigation, hearing, or inquiry held by that public body, or a court action.

MCL 15.362. Over the years I have found whistleblower claims to be the most dangerous claims to defend, in part because of the decisions from the appellate bench.  For example, case law provides that (1) the employee’s motive to use the law as a sword, rather than a shield (i.e., trying to obtain some job security when he/she is about to be fired) is no longer relevant; (2) it doesn’t matter if the employee’s job required him/her to make the report and they were simply acting within the scope of their duties; and (3) conferring with an attorney, who is an “officer of the court”,  satisfies the “public body” requirement). These are just a few of the troubling rulings for employers from Michigan’s appellate bench.

To prove her claim,  plaintiff is required to show (1) she engaged in protected activity; (2) the employer took an adverse action against her; and (3) a causal connection existed between the two. Here, it is undisputed that plaintiff reported a violation of the law (the alleged rape) to a public body (the police and the court). While STEP conceded that it based its decision on plaintiff’s report (the causal connection), it argued as a defense that it had not taken an “adverse action” against the plaintiff because it reinstated her.  Does any reader believe for a moment that this argument succeeded?

Defendants admitted that for “a period of several weeks plaintiff was suspended, and therefore prevented from receiving services and earning pay from STEP, and that her suspension was based solely on her decision to report Eiland and his alleged sexual assault of plaintiff to police.”   This is clearly an adverse employment action.  I recall one court’s opinion that held a suspension, that was thereafter paid, was an adverse employment action because of the uncertainty and stress during the period of suspension.

Defendants also argued that the suspension was “justified” because STEP had consulted with the Authority and that the state mental health code required it to treat both plaintiff and Eiland the same – either suspend both or neither.  The appellate court noted that defendants failed to cite any legal authority that supported their proposition that “the victim of an alleged crime should be treated exactly the same as the alleged perpetrator”. The appellate court seems shocked and displeased by the defendants’ actions too.

The appellate court noted that “there is only one exception to [WPA’s] prohibition against taking an adverse employment action as retaliation for otherwise protected conduct:  if the employee knowingly makes a false report about the alleged violation of law.” The court rejected defendants’ position, stating “[t]here is not, as defendants seem to believe, an exception granted for employers who feel they can justify conduct that otherwise violated the WPA.”  Because defendant Carter signed the suspension form and was identified as the decision maker, she is also responsible for any violation of the WPA.  Thus, the appellate court reversed the dismissal of the WPA claim as to both defendants and sent the claim under the WPA back to the lower court for trial.

This case just leaves me shaking my head and wondering at what point did STEP consult with an employment attorney. Perhaps not until the lawsuit was filed at which point defense counsel was stuck with the facts above.  If there is one take away for the reader it should be this:  always consult with an experienced employment attorney before you take action against an employee whenever you have any unusual circumstances. There may be little any attorney can do for these defendants given the actions taken and the admissions that they have made.

This article was written by Claudia D. Orr, who is Secretary of the Board of Detroit SHRM, a member of the Legal Affairs Committee, and an experienced labor/employment attorney at the Detroit office of Plunkett Cooney (a full service law firm and resource partner of Detroit SHRM) and an arbitrator with the American Arbitration Association.  She can be reached at corr@plunkettcooney.com or at (313) 983-4863. For further information go to: http://www.plunkettcooney.com/people-105.html

 

Detroit SHRM encourages members to share these articles with others, inside and outside their organization, as long as its name and logo, and the author’s information, is included in the re-post of the article. January 2019.

 

Time is running out to recognize Notable Women in HR

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By: Crain’s Detroit Business 

 

crains

Crain’s Detroit Business will name the 2019 Notable Women in HR in a special report on March 18.

In that report, we’ll profile women who are the glue holding their organizations together, are employee advocates, have an eagle’s eye for talent, consult on best practices and are considered leaders in their workplaces and in the community.

The form and accompanying materials must be submitted by Monday, Jan. 28.

 

NOMINATE

Ultimate Software hosts 2019 Top HR Technology Trends you need to know

Ultimate Software

By: Ultimate Software

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 1-22-19

 

Ultimate Software hosts 2019 Top HR Technology Trends you need to know

 

HR that gets respect at the executive table has to have a compelling HR systems strategy. That’s just one of the findings of the latest annual overview of important HR systems trends by Sierra-Cedar.

Register for our complimentary live webcast on February 5th, 2pm EST as Stacey Harris, VP of research and analytics at Sierra-Cedar, and Cecile Alper-Leroux, VP of human capital management innovation at Ultimate Software discuss new insights from the world’s largest HR technology benchmarking study and the trends guiding the workforce in 2019—along with practical advice to capitalize on your HR technology investments and ensure the best levels of technology user adoption.

Approved for 1 SHRM, HRCI, & HRPA credit

Register Here: https://www.ultimatesoftware.com/contactform/7010d000001GS1P?utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=webcast

Contact Christie Hecht for more information:
Christie_Hecht@UltimateSoftware.com
248.229.5125

Speakers:

Cecile Alper-Leroux
cecile

Cecile Alper-Leroux is the VP of HCM Innovation at Ultimate Software and a sought out peaker, thought leader, and visionary on HCM trends, hot topics, and global strategies. An economic anthropologist with more than 20 years of experience worldwide, Cecile has dedicated her life to helping companies design experiences that enable all people to achieve highly purposeful and productive jobs. She is passionate about the extraordinary transformation of the work environment and the vastly more human-centered ways of building meaningful careers. A recognized voice in the HCM industry, Cecile has been featured in Forbes, HuffPost, HR Magazine, HRD Canada TV, and The Wall Street Journal.

Stacey Harris

Stacey.jpgStacey Harris is VP of research and analytics for Sierra-Cedar, overseeing their annual HR Systems Survey and research. With a M.A. Ed and B.A. degrees from Kent State and Ashland University, she has been a leading member of the HR practices and technology research community with groundbreaking research on high-impact HR organizations, enterprise HR technologies, and key practices across the talent management spectrum. Prior to joining Sierra-Cedar, Harris held executive level research roles with multiple research organizations. She has launched multiple research initiatives in HR, talent management, learning, rewards, and organization and governance. In July of 2017, Stacey was appointed to The International Association for Human Resource Information Management (IHRIM) Board of Directors. Harris is also a co-Host of HR Tech Weekly Radio Show and a frequent speaker and facilitator at HR events in the U.S. and abroad.

Gooden Joins Plunkett Cooney Transportation Law Practice Group

Plunkett Cooney

By: Plunkett Cooney 

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DATE:  January 21, 2019
CONTACT:  John E. Cornwell (248) 901-4008

 

Gooden joins Plunkett Cooney’s transportation group

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich. – January 21, 2019 – Plunkett Cooney, one of the oldest and largest law firms in the Midwest, has increased the depth of its Transportation Law Practice Group with the addition of attorney D’Antae D. Gooden.

A member of Plunkett Cooney’s Bloomfield Hills office, Gooden focuses his litigation practice in the areas of third-party motor vehicle negligence, no fault law, premises liability and employment litigation.

Gooden2018_Original.jpgGooden has experience handling first-party personal injury protection claims, third-party auto negligence claims, as well as cases involving alleged fraud and suspicious insured claims related to motor vehicle accidents. He also has experience handling employment law matters that include allegations of discrimination, sexual harassment, retaliation and civil rights violations.

Gooden graduated, cum laude, from the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law in 2018. He received his undergraduate degree from Michigan State University in 2015.

Plunkett Cooney’s Transportation Law Practice Group includes the talents of more than 20 attorneys across the states of Michigan, Ohio and Indiana. The group members provide an array of litigation and risk management services, including particular expertise in the areas of trucking liability, first- and third-party auto liability, cross-border claims with Canada, fraud investigation services and emergency accident response.

Established in 1913, Plunkett Cooney is a leading provider of transactional and litigation services to clients in the private and public sectors. The firm employs approximately 150 attorneys in eight Michigan cities, Chicago, Illinois, Columbus, Ohio and Indianapolis, Indiana. Plunkett Cooney has achieved the highest rating (AV) awarded by Martindale-Hubbell, a leading, international directory of law firms. The firm was also recently selected by Crain’s Detroit Business as its inaugural Law Firm of the Year.

For more information about Gooden joining Plunkett Cooney’s Transportation Law Practice Group, contact the firm’s Director of Marketing & Practice Development John Cornwell at (248) 901-4008 or jcornwell@plunkettcooney.com.

 

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ASE Courses Now Offered in Mount Clemens and Lansing

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By: American Society of Employers (ASE)

 

American Society of Employers to offer HR and leadership-focused classes in two new locations: Mount Clemens and Lansing

Media Contact: Heather Nezich, Communications Manager, ASE, 248.223.8040, hnezich@aseonline.org

Livonia, Mich. —January 16, 2019 — ASE, a not-for-profit employer association that serves as a source for information and support on all matters affecting employment, recently announced that it would expand the instructor-led courses it offers into Mount Clemens and Lansing. “We are very excited to extend our reach to these areas in Michigan,” stated ASE President & CEO Mary E. Corrado.  “As our membership grows, we continue to extend our services to meet their needs.”

In partnership with Macomb County Planning and Economic Development, ASE now offers classes in Mount Clemens for HR professionals and business leaders.  “Macomb County offers many services to help businesses achieve success,” said John Paul Rea, Director of the Department of Planning & Economic Development. “This new partnership offers a great opportunity for HR professionals and others to enhance their skills at a training offered close to home.”

ASE has partnered with the Michigan Bankers Association to bring similar classes to the Lansing area.  “We are excited to collaborate with the American Society of Employers to bring our members even more valuable training options,” stated Stephanie A. Fisher, Director of Education, Michigan Bankers Association.

As an introductory offer, ASE is offering member rates and an additional 10% discount now through March 15. To take advantage of this offer, enter discount code ‘TD10’ when registering.  Interested individuals can register by email at asetraining@aseonline.org or by calling 248-223-8041. A full list of classes and events can be found on the ASE website at www.aseonline.org.

 

 About the American Society of Employers (ASE) – a Centennial Organization

The American Society of Employers (ASE) is a not-for-profit trade association providing people-management information and services to Michigan employers for over 115 years. Since 1902, member organizations have relied on ASE to be their single, cost-effective source for information and support, helping to grow their bottom line by enhancing the effectiveness of their people. Learn more about ASE at www.aseonline.org.

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